If you’re a Mac user and love to toddle around lines and splines in AutoCAD, you’ll be freezing and unfreezing your layers in frantic excitement today. AutoCAD for Mac is back. You’ve likely felt the screen-shifting vibrations from the Autodesk marketing machine over the past two weeks. All to build up for the reveal over the facewaves of their Facebook facecast. That’s a lot of face. Let’s see what Autodesk is dishin’ out.

AutoCAD for MAC

AutoCAD was last compatible on the Mac all the way back in 1992 for Release 12. If you’ve been hibernating since then waiting for the enlightenment, you now get to feast on your choice of three different versions:

  • AutoCAD for Mac ($3995)
  • AutoCAD LT for Mac ($899)
  • AutoCAD WS for Mac (Free)

Over a year ago we knew AutoCAD was in beta on the Mac. The move was questioned by many. What makes sense? That AutoCAD users who prefer Macs, can now use them. What doesn’t make sense? That many of Autodesk’s other products are still PC. Namely Inventor and Revit. This list is getting smaller though. (Mac compatible products here.) So, will we see Inventor for Mac next? Likely.

Revolutionary for Design?

To sum it up. If you saw the Design 8/16 Youtube video you know Autodesk went to great lengths to promote this. Why? My comments from the hype post:
“You’re not the only one disappointed. Apparently this has something to do with Design? An existing program brought out (again) on an existing platform is not changing anything about design. useful? for some, yes. Revolutionary? nope.”

If you’re really excited and just can’t wait to find out more, you can see an overview of everything including how to move from AutoCAD to AutoCAD for Mac here.

Thanks to John Evans of Design & Motion for breaking the news.

Author

Josh is founder and editor at SolidSmack.com, founder at Aimsift Inc., and co-founder of EvD Media. He is involved in engineering, design, visualization, the technology making it happen, and the content developed around it. He is a SolidWorks Certified Professional and excels at falling awkwardly.