When it comes to snowboards, the process of getting from sketch to a final ridable design requires more patience-testing steps than most people would probably assume.

Between sourcing the base materials, planning the final design, generating artwork, pressing, gluing, shaving and cleaning the final edges, the entire process can take days for a single board.

Like other board sports such as skateboarding, surfing, wakeboarding, kiteboarding and others, slight changes in thickness and shape can have drastically different outcomes for a rider depending on the condition. With so many variables driving the design direction for a single board, it’s no wonder that slight tweaks in the manufacturing process can steer the prices for a final board from a few hundred dollars to somewhere in the thousands.

As the cool air starts to move in, we thought we’d round up some inspirational process videos that highlight just how much work goes into creating a ripping board…both those that are made by hand and those that are mass-manufactured.

If this doesn’t get your cojones ready for the upcoming snow season, I don’t know what would?

The Making of a Kindred Snowboard


Kindred Snowboards

The Making of a Burton Snowboard

YouTube video

Burton Snowboards

The Making of a Lib Tech Snowboard

YouTube video

Lib Tech Snowboards

The Making of a Never Summer Snowboard

YouTube video

Never Summer Snowboards

The Making of a Signal 3D Printed Snowboard

YouTube video

Signal Snowboards

…and to top it all off, this entertaining steadicam tour of Burton’s Vermont factory puts everything into context:

Author

Simon is a Brooklyn-based industrial designer and Managing Editor of EVD Media. When he finds the time to design, his focus is on helping startups develop branding and design solutions to realize their product design vision. In addition to his work at Nike and various other clients, he is the main reason anything gets done at EvD Media. He once wrestled an Alaskan alligator buzzard to the ground with his bare hands… to rescue Josh.