We’re walking the floor at Solidworks World 2018. One must see is Easton LaChappelle’s Unlimited Tommorrow (UT) exhibit. He is cranking out some amazing prosthetic devices! Easton at 14-years-old took an interest in robotics where he submitted a robotic artificial limb in a science fair. His epiphany with regard to his future role in the world of robotics came by way of his “chance” meeting with Momo an amputee. Easton was moved by this young girl’s plight. He learned that Momo was outfitted with an $80,00 artificial limb. Getting a closer look, he saw that her prosthetic was clearly inferior to his. From that moment on he set out to develop a new model in artificial limb creation and accessibility.

The Birth of a Vision

For a greater good, Easton LaChappelle chose to deny himself of all that’s common in the life of today’s teens.  Now, seven years later at 22-years-old, his hard work is bearing fruit. Easton is garnering loads of industry support, with Microsoft showing up as one of the key sponsors. More importantly, he has perfected the artificial limb he set at to develop for Momo. Complete with physical characteristics natural to Momo, haptics, and much more, the prosthetic is a sight to behold. All I might add, to the tune of a modest $5k! It was a long time in coming, but LaChappelle and Momo finally met. Easton personally delivered and fitted Momo with her very own, personalized artificial limb!

 

Mission

A general overview of the Unlimited Tomorrow mission and development model is as follows:

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Process Overview

For a  technical overview of  LaChappelle’s new model in artificial limb development have a look at his 2018 CES interview. Much of Easton’s work is open-sourced and is available at TheRoboArm site.

For information on the availability of Easton LaChappelle, please email feel free to email him at [email protected] If you want to support Easton’s effort visiting his Microventures Funding page.

Author

Vince is Associate Professor of Industrial Design at Virginia Tech University. Vince has worked as Studio Engineer for consumer and medical product brands such as Whirlpool, Newell and ResMed Ltd. Australia. He's garnered 39+ patents and has designed everything from totes to toasters, and fiddles to furniture. He enjoys all things 3D and has carved out a niche as a Class-A Surfacing Guru. Active in both industry and academia, Vince serves as a Creative and Technical Skill Development Coach providing hands-on training and workshops pertaining to CAID/CAD. Vince relishes opportunities to keep learning and sharing what he's learned!