It isn’t difficult to grow plants when you have your own garden, but what if you live in a cramped apartment? Not everyone has the space to get their green thumb on, so Chilean industrial designer Lorenzo Vega thought it would be useful to make a modular planter which makes use of otherwise unused vertical real estate:

Inpsired by the Japanese architectural movement called Metabolism, the modular planter uses a series of square floors and circular holes to hold your local plant life. Simply put your plant in a small pot, add a floor tile, and watch your green baby grow.

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Icon of Japanese Metabolism architecture, The Nakagin Capsule Tower.
modular planter
Concept drawings for the modular planter design.
modular planter
Final rendering of the vertical stacking concept for the modular planter design.
modular planter
The two base parts for the modular planter design.
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Adding the planter sections together.

The planter’s main feature is its LEGO-like modules. You can add a new floor either on the side or above your existing garden to make room more plants. If your plants start to get bigger, you can slot in an extra see-through vertical wall for your growing babies.

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Creating different configurations of the modular planter.
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On the countertop or on the patio, it creates more space and more fresh greens.

The best part about the modular planter is how you can adapt and rearrange it to your personal preference or space. If you decide to move some plants or if you’re looking for a change of scenery, all you need to do is adjust the modules, add some here, place some there.

Lorenzo Vega has more details about this versatile plant holder on his Behance page. It’s an ingenious concept design we would like to see put into production or provided as 3D print. The idea actually lends itself to variations that could be made with sustainable materials — wood or clay pots, for example. Though the water column will be important for some plants, many have grown veggies, herb, and other plants on their countertops for years, so it’s certainly doable. If you have a variation of this design, do share!

Author

Carlos wrestles gators, and by gators, we mean words. He also loves good design, good books, and good coffee.