If you suspend the science behind it, the act of soldering is a work of magic. By heating a filler metal, one can join two or more materials which would otherwise not fit together (like pizza and pineapple, for example).

Barb Noren is a self-described maker who also sees soldering as a magical process. So magic that she felt it was necessary to combine her soldering iron with the body of a My Little Pony toy—and now you can, too:

After cutting the soldering iron cord to remove the mechanical parts, Barb keeps a half inch of plastic to keep the soldering iron suspended over Rainbow Dash’s head. Doing so prevents the toy skull from melting and the metal from coming into contact with the pony’s luscious plastic hair. Using a vice to keep the plastic in place, she cuts into Rainbow Dash using a Dremel rotary tool.

soldering unicorn

To prepare the unicorn head for its surgical implantation, she sketches a hole in the forehead far away from the hair, but large enough to let the threaded part of the soldering case fit through. She then switches the Dremel rotary part for a carbon bit and gets to drilling the pony’s skull wide open.

soldering unicorn

You’d think Rainbow Dash’s pain and suffering was over, but you would be wrong. Barb pries the pony’s head from its body using a screwdriver and prepares to insert the soldering iron through its head but before she can do so, she finds out the hole in the neck is too small for the parts to fit through. Using the Dremel carbon bit once more, she widens the neck’s gap and drills a hole in the back of one of the legs for the power cord to fit through.

soldering unicorn

Barb then covers the circuit board in heat shrink tubing before sliding the case back on and using pliers to pull the drill into place. She uses more heat shrink tubing to connect the soldering iron wires to the rest of the power cord, using smaller segments to fit the remaining staggered parts. She solders the wires back together and pops the head back onto the unicorn’s body.

soldering unicorn

Barb demonstrates the soldering iron works by crafting a necklace for Rainbow Dash to wear. While she can’t hold the iron in her hands like a pen, the pony does make it easy to work with a stationary soldering iron.

You can find more of Barb’s quirky and humorous making videos on her YouTube channel, Barb Makes Things. Full-written instructions for all her builds (and this one eventually) can also be found on her Instructables page.

Author

Carlos wrestles gators, and by gators, we mean words. He also loves good design, good books, and good coffee.