Some would say sketching is severely limited in most 3D design software. Some wouldn’t even call it sketching, but more a fork jab into the gum-line process of tediously picking points to create kinda the shape you’re looking for. UMake is asking you to toss that process (lay down that fork) and put your ideas into 3D from the beginning.

If you’ve designed anything, you’ve sketched something. At some point or another, lines were drawn, scribbles were made and someone almost gave you a high-five for drawing a lopsided circle. The paper was tossed, maybe scanned before, and off to the modeling you went.

The disconnect is obvious with, as many applications for drawing and sketching, no solution to make it part of the modeling process; no method for hand-drawn shapes to be the beginning of your model instead of the two-dimensional background image to match geometry against.

UMake allows all those lines you draw, lines drawn in 3D space by the way, to be converted to geometry. Initially demonstrated on an iPad, the interface is minimal with but a few commands that harness a lot of functionality. The focus is on the sketch elements you draw via a stylus. Commands to reshape, extrude or edit control points allow you to get exactly the look, and that perfect circle, you’re looking for.

UMake_iPad

“The reaction we’re getting is amazing.” Eviathar Meyer, Co-founder and CEO of UMake told us. “It’s a totally different experience compared to traditional CAD software and changes the way people think about sketching.”

“One of the main outcomes that we can see is that you can explore the shape and form while you’re in a 3D environment – this is a huge benefit while exploring ideas. Additionally, it saves lot of time by getting to complex curves and surfaces without the hassles.”

UMake_car03

UMake_Sunglass02

Currently, they have a beta version and are working with an unnamed leader in the 3D printing field to create a seamless experience to go from 3D sketch to 3D print without going back and forth from UMake to 3D printing software.

The beta version supports export for IGES and OBJ file formats with support for more file formats planned in the near future. Have an iPad? UMake is looking for people to join their early access program and provide feedback. Visit their site and sign up here.

Author

Josh is founder and editor at SolidSmack.com, founder at Aimsift Inc., and co-founder of EvD Media. He is involved in engineering, design, visualization, the technology making it happen, and the content developed around it. He is a SolidWorks Certified Professional and excels at falling awkwardly.