As we’ve seen in the past, bigger, higher resolution TVs can lead to bigger, higher resolution computer screens. Well, how would you like at 146″ computer screen in your face? We love the tech debuted at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) and The Wall, a 146-inch “microLED” TV announce by Samsung, is one of our favs this year.

The scale of Samsung's Wall - Image: CNET
The scale of Samsung’s Wall is impressive… and it’s modular. Image: CNET

At 10 feet wide by almost 6 feet tall, it’s the size of, not a full grown person, but a small group of full-grown people. The Wall has a module-based design which allows it to be sized bigger or smaller than 146 inches for different space.

Now this is interesting as, ultimately, these screens could be used to create monitor configurations that fit your office space, cubical, conference room, etc.

That this is a MicroLED display is interesting as well. MicroLED panels are made up of millions of tiny, tiny LEDS (measuring less than 100 µm each) which use an inorganic Gallium Nitride (or GaN) material to produce the ultra-bright picture. The make up allows for lighter, thinner displays that don’t require color filters or backlight. With it, The Wall hits brightness values higher than tradtional LED TVs and nearly matching OLED while reducing power consumption. They have a longer lifespan than LCD and OLED as well; meaning the only thing keeping you from completing your CAD projects now is your creativity and possible loss of eyesight.

While questions on ports, support and other options (like price and availability) are still left unanswered, Samsung says The Wall will come in a number of different sizes and, unlike most of the products on the showroom floor, be available later this year.

Though it may seem excessive, I’m a bit enthralled by the idea of sitting further back from a larger screen, driving design software and jumping into a scale view first-person sim of the design. You?

Author

Josh is co-founder of EvD Media. He engineers and designs, is the Director of Marketing for Luxion, is CSWP certified for SolidWorks training and support and excels at falling awkwardly. He is editor of SolidSmack.com and co-host of EngineerVsDesigner.com, a weekly podcast about design, engineering and what makes it all happen.