Save for the gluten-free militia, just about everybody loves pasta. It’s filling, reasonably easy to cook, and you can still eat it long after your teeth have fallen out from old age. 

But would your obsession for the Italian dish run so deep that you’d make a working PC out of it?

If not, then you clearly don’t love pasta as much as Micah Laplante, the sole owner, and creator of Laplanet Arts. What started as a joke made by his wife eventually drove Micah to try his hand at making a working computer out of a variety of pasta:

To be clear, only the outer parts of the PC are made from pasta. As good as it may taste, there hasn’t been a food concocted which can power or operate an entire computer on the power of sauce and wheat alone.

Pasta PC

To start, Micah takes the insides of an old Asus Transformer tablet and repurposes them for his pasta project. After making sure it still works, he removes the motherboard, battery, and the other extra parts which run the computer.

Pasta PC
Pasta PC

With the parts out of the old computer, he can now start building his PC case. He sets a couple of uncooked lasagna strips on his desk and tries to arrange the parts he just removed onto the base. To keep the lasagna pieces together, he applies some hot glue onto the edges of the strips.

Pasta PC
Pasta PC

He arranges the USB ports, circuit board, and battery onto the base before following up with the power button, the volume buttons, and antenna. Since you can’t close off the PC without gluing it shut, Micah will not be able to open his creation once the glue sets in.

Pasta PC
Pasta PC
Pasta PC

He seals the entire build with a glue gun, making sure to add layers and different types of pasta in between the empty space. To give the laptop a more lasagna-like look, he colors the glue red and adds some yellow acrylic paint on top of the PC.

Pasta PC
Pasta PC

If you were expecting him to put it in the oven once he was finished, then you’ll be sorely disappointed. Since electronics tend to explode when exposed to high temperatures, Micah is more than happy to have a working, uncooked lasagna computer than a cooked, non-working one.

So how does it work?

Pasta PC

Pretty much how you’d expect a dated laptop to work, actually. Since the original Asus Transformer’s only problem was the LCD screen, the computer itself still works fine. It can open your basic Microsoft applications, run streaming services and your basic games, though at times it struggles to run video game emulators for old consoles.

The full video is worth watching, as Micah inserts a ton of humor while making and using the lasagna laptop. To see more of his computer creations, check out the Laplanet Arts webpage and Youtube channel.

Author

Carlos wrestles gators, and by gators, we mean words. He also loves good design, good books, and good coffee.