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Honestly I can’t get enough of what people are able to do with some of the rendering programs of late. Especially with KeyShot 2.1 we covered last week. Al at Develop 3D took a rip through KeyShot 2.1 as well. His overview, rendering results and the video he slapped together (after the jump) are nothing but impressive. Have a look.

The KeyShot rendering process

Al demonstrates the process of taking several models through the process of import, adding materials, adjusting environment settings and final render. The video is speed up, but you get the idea of how quickly you can create renderings of complicated models… while listening to some fabulous tunage from Outlines via Sonar Kollektiv.

Rendering a car

Al displayed his ability to create some great visuals of automotive design. To me, cars are one of the most challenging and enjoyable objects to render. Below is a rendering of an Audi R8 I took a stab at. Everything except for the environment are the standard materials without any adjustments. The total time it took create this, including rendering, was a little under an hour.

An Audi R8 rendered in KeyShot 2.1. All existing materials with no adjustments. (Click to Enlarge)

An Audi R8 rendered in KeyShot 2.1. All existing materials with no adjustments. (Click to Enlarge)

Material adjustment tip

So obviously, KeyShot is dead simple for creating renderings using the standard material library that comes with it. But if you’re like me, you may not be happy unless the rendering is as realistic as possible. I wasn’t completely happy with the results above. The car comes off a bit too shiny. So, I made some adjustments to the materials.

However, where you adjust the material properties may not be the most obvious. To edit any material you apply to an object, right-click on it in the Realtime render window and select “Edit Material”. (You’ll also notice there are options to Copy, Paste and Save Materials.) Depending on what material you’ve selected, a group of options will appear in an Options window.

To edit materials in KeyShot, right-click on the material and select Edit Material... (Click to Enlarge)

To edit materials in KeyShot, right-click on the material and select Edit Material... (Click to Enlarge)

Notice you have the option to change the type of material as well. For the Audi, I wanted to bring down the shininess. To do this I selected the materials for the car body and brought down the Ior setting while increasing the Metal roughness and Roughness settings. I changed the material of the wheels to metal and adjusted the color, then used copy and paste to transfer the material settings over to the other wheels. Nothing complicated. Here is what the car looked like BEFORE material adjustments…

The Realtime rendering before any material adjustments (Click to Enlarge)

The Realtime rendering BEFORE any material adjustments (Click to Enlarge)

and AFTER material adjustments…

The Realtime rendering AFTER material adjustments (Click to Enlarge)

The Realtime rendering AFTER material adjustments (Click to Enlarge)

Better? Worse? I’d like to make the edges a little softer, but the only way I’ve been able to do that is with some post processing in Photoshop. But this rendering, for the time it took to do, I’ll can live with. If you have any tips for material adjustments and getting rendering to look more realistic, I’d love to hear about them in the comments.

Note: The Audi R8 is from a SolidWorks surfacing tutorial. You can find out more about the tutorial here.

Filed under: ROCKIN'