Geode w Card

The Wisdom of the Crowd: Geode by iCache and Maxifab 3D Printer

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There’s a little site called Kickstarter. It has a lot of amazing crowdfunded projects on it and, like us, you may have a mild, vein-slapping addiction to it. If so, these are two that you’ll want to check out. One has exceeded its funding by leaps and bounds. The other is just about to break through their goal. Hit it.

The Geode, by iCache

The Geode is an iPhone Appcessory that stores credit cards, loyalty cards, gift cards, and membership cards and protects the information with biometric security. The onboard universal card and e-ink barcode screen means that any card can be stored in the Geode and used anytime, anywhere.

It works like this. You access the app via the reader, then select your card. The Geode encodes information onto their Universal Card which is in the reader slot on the back. Swipe your newly encoded card at the ATM or Cashier. After five years of effort by the good men and women at iCache, I’m happy to hear that they have picked up $254,794 from 1,282 backers …all with 24 days left on the clock. This is great news for a great idea… for a few reasons. Losing your wallet isn’t a big deal anymore since the Geode comes with a fingerprint reader. Wallet space is loosened. And you get a sleek, funky case to boot.

Missed Opportunity: Couldn’t they have done away with the separate card and had the magnetic strip pop out when necessary? And is this ‘universal card’ really universal?

Maxifab 3D Printer Framework

The heart of the Maxifab framework consists of a set of plastic parts that hold the key functionality of the machine and allows for an almost limitless choice of case materials, designs, and dimensions. Using the Maxifab framework, the end user can build his/her machine from anything ranging from plywood to carbon fiber, and as small as a shoebox or as big as a refrigerator -the build envelope is directly related to the case size. And since the plastics, motors, electronics, bearings, etc are reusable, it is possible to start small and expand later.

Very unique idea – wish I’d thought of that.

Missed Opportunity: I could see a hell of a lot of problems putting this type of design together. A proper frame is important because any movement in the frame means the extruder will not be at x,y,z when the computer calls for it. But hey! It’d be terrible to see this not make it. As of this writing, Maxifab is at $4,892 of its $5,000 goal with 16 days left – lets get him there.

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About jf

JF Brandon is contributing author for SolidSmack, loves his DIY, his 3D Printing, the Future and the history of Design and Manufacturing. He runs DShape CAnada and lives in Vancouver, Canada. If you see something on the Internet you think he'd like, pass it along!

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