The Magnificent Sphere of SolidWorks, Rhino, & Blender Design

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If you’ve surrounded yourself with thousands of lighted spheres like I have, you’ll be interested to learn of the potential for incredibly cool design living within each of the precious glowing orbs.

Andre Baran of formendesign.de knows, and has animated a spherical surprise to impress upon you the true nature of transformation as applied to the simple shape. From it, five unique design literally unfold in a process that combines SolidWorks, Rhino and Blender to produce the results. Andre tells us more.

The theme of this study is the mechanical transformation, a change of the form. The 5 items that have arisen here, fall back in form and process of change on analogies from nature. A sphere, the simplest geometric shape that we know, serves as a starting form.

From Andre:

The idea was simply to cut something into pieces and than put it together to create something new. A lamp for example and I showed the process of this reconstruction in my animation.

I often use the mix of SolidWorks and Rhino for modeling. SolidWorks is a fast, strong tool with some weaknesses that can be amended with Rhino. I speak about things like surface modeling, free-form tools and mesh export-options. I use Blender for animation, rendering and post-processing. This swiss-knife like tool, offers you everything that novice animator needs.

I don’t know about you, but I’d take one of each of these.

Huge hat tip to Andrew Price!

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About Josh Mings

Josh is co-founder of EvD Media. He engineers and designs, is the Marketing Manager for Luxion, is a CSWP certified for SolidWorks training and support and excels at falling awkwardly. He is editor of SolidSmack.com and co-host of EngineerVsDesigner.com, a weekly podcast about design, engineering and what makes it all happen.

Josh on google+