solidworks-plastics

SolidWorks Plastics Gets the Plasticy Design Goodness Flowin’

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Besides enjoying the warmth of freshly molten plastic against their skin, plastic part designer and mold makers appreciate parts that don’t shrink unevenly or have an excessive amount of undercuts. SolidWorks has launched an addon to help part designers of the world catch and ‘predict’ issues that may come up during manufacturing with a new product aptly named, SolidWorks Plastics.

SolidWorks Plastics

If you’ve been a SolidWorks user in the mold manufacturing industry prior to 2008, you may remember Moldflow, a plastics simulation addon for SolidWorks. It was acquired by Autodesk and the SolidWorks plugin went poof. SIMPOE, another plastics simulation software maker, was playing on the sidelines with their own SimpoeWorks addon when this happened. Fast forward to 2012, (only 4 years later?) and SolidWorks has reached an agreement to distribute the addon, repackaged as SolidWorks Plastics, through the SolidWorks VAR channel. SolidWorks Plastics is developed and maintained by Simpoe, who also happen to develop a stand-alone version and a similar plugin for Siemens Solid Edge.

SolidWorks Plastics loads a new tab in your FeatureManager and adds a tab to your beloved Ribbon bar with options to set material for your part from a list of commonly used materials, apply a manufacturing process and run an analysis to see how jacked up things could get when the plastic starts a’flowin’. Here’s the video that uses phrases like, “time to market”, “intuitive workflows” and “injection molding machine size”.

Now, who doesn’t think that animated injection analysis isn’t dang cool. It’s liable to make mold makers shed plastic tear pellets of joy… like they’re not already, and putting them in a bowl with milk. You know it’s good.

According to SolidWorks, SolidWorks Plastics will be offered in two packages:

  • SolidWorks Plastics Professional for part designers
  • SolidWorks Plastics Premium for mold designers and mold makers

We reached out for pricing information, with no luck. If you reach out for pricing, you’ll need to contact your VAR. Currently, SolidWorks plastics is only available in North America. Other parts of the world get in on the action later this year.

via: Businesswire

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About Josh Mings

Josh is co-founder of EvD Media. He engineers and designs, is the Marketing Manager for Luxion, is a CSWP certified for SolidWorks training and support and excels at falling awkwardly. He is editor of SolidSmack.com and co-host of EngineerVsDesigner.com, a weekly podcast about design, engineering and what makes it all happen.

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  • Mike Puckett

    Josh,

    As a former plastic injection mold designer, this is great news.  Since the sale of mold flow and the subsequent disappearance of mold flow xpress in SolidWorks, there just simply hasn’t been a good solution for plastic flow simulation that was easy to use.  The greatest part about SolidWorks Plastics is that it runs inside SolidWorks.  No exporting to a different program which was very cumbersome, especially as you made design changes based on the results.  I’ve shown the software to several former colleagues, and a lot of them are looking forward to the release in a couple of weeks.  It almost makes me year for the days of designing all the plasticy goodness I used to get to do!

  • Cast one

    Solidworks Plastics sounds like a good think. I wish they would also get into molten metal. The only way right now is to buy a stand alone product. These products like Magma and Finite Solutions cost a lot of money. It there was an affordable add on in Solid works, I believe many people would be interested,

  • http://twitter.com/zeometric Zeometric LLC

    After pulling some teeth, here is the pricing:
    SolidWorks Plastics: $4,995.00
    SolidWorks Plastics Premium:  $14,995.00

    (Hefty price to pay if you ask me)…

  • Mpuckett

    Go check out mold flow which does not run natively inside Solidworks, and is about as user friendly as a Chinese finger cuff device, yet costs twice as much. That’s pretty hefty! I used to use mold flow, and I have been using Solidworks Plastics, there is simply no comparison between the two in terms of ease of use.

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