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When they made the announcement a few months ago, botObjects came under scrutiny from the designer/maker crowd because they had little more than a vector-esque orthographic rendering of what the 3D printer would look like….with no 3D print examples. They followed up a few weeks later with some sample prints, however there was still no video ‘proof’ of how the darn thing worked. As the saying goes “better late than never”, the co-founders today released a video of the printer in action. Let’s take a look shall we?

First Video from botObjects

Featuring 25 micron printing using their own PLA filament, the video (embed for this page temporarily not working) was taken with the printer printing at 175 mm/s, with the video accelerated at certain points for the purpose of summarization. According to botObjects, the floral vase seen in the video was “printed exactly as offered, yet the ProDesk3D printed at a higher resolution than the original STL file”.

Let’s take a closer look at that resolution now, shall we?

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Zoom X1

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The video also highlights their ‘new’ translucent PLA colors. These guys love to build hype…until it’s released, it’s all ‘new’, right?

founders

Regardless of when and where we’ll see the printer, it’s nice to see them being more transparent with their development…an often overlooked yet critical trait for today’s consumers…especially products geared towards makers and designers.

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Also be sure to check out our popular EngineerVsDesigner episode with the botObject founders:

(images via botObjects)

Filed under: NEWS

  • al dean

    So it does banded filament builds. That’s not exactly what they were talking about. Or is it? I’m baffled.. Peeps have been doing this for a while.

    But what I’m really confused by is this corker:

    “ProDesk3D printed at a higher resolution than the original STL file”

    Ummm.. the **** does that mean?

    You could have a 10mm cube, that’s made up of exactly 12 triangles. The resolution would be 10mm. Right? But the machine would build it up in a specific number of layers at a specific thickness.

    These guys might have something, but they really need to think this shit through before they post it.

    Al

  • Adam

    I remain skeptical.

  • Josh M

    yep, was expecting full on mixing of colors. The resolution looks nice, but I’m as baffled by that statement as you.

  • http://virtualvector.com burhop

    Quality looks good although I’d like to hold it in my hand.

    Not having to stop my printer to feed in a different color would be nice.

    The STL comment was a bit strange (like Al pointed out).

    Is that actual speed in the video?

  • Adam

    Definitely NOT actual speed. Even the slow parts are sped up. I confirmed by running the Makerbot at 175mm/sec, and frankly it’s not that fast. @25um per layer, it takes 1 hour per cc
    Sent from my telegraph.

  • scottmoyse

    Looks like it would be a 3 into 1 nozzle to me. It looks like the colours do blend a smidgen as the last of the old colour is pushed out & mixes with the new.

  • Vlad

    The video looks fishy. Sometime the metal block that is supposed to be a head seems to move according to the profile of the vase and sometimes it appears to have a random motion and i don’t think that’s because of the time lapse. Also strange is the framing, a single closeup view.

    It’s possible that the video is reversed and what we see is actually a grinding or melting machine.

    Also, on their page at the bottom there is a planetary gear assembly that looks to have powder residue on the black parts.

    I’ve seen several makers present their creations and communicate to the public, they don’t do it in an obscure way. And if someone, for some reason thought that being obscure was a good idea, the public outcry would set them straight immediately… that is if they actually had something material to present.